Where to buy medical marijuana in Florida

Where to buy medical marijuana in Florida

Where to buy medical marijuana in Florida

Where to buy medical marijuana in Florida

Where to buy medical marijuana in Florida: This is not Snoop Dogg’s CVS. You’re not rolling in armed with your prescription and picking up an ounce of bud like it’s Seattle, and you’re on your lunch break. Hell, you’re not even picking up a package of minty-delicious brownies like in some other medicinally-legal states. What you’re getting now are extracts, oils, and tinctures. Rules on edibles are coming at some point, but the Department of Health is moving about as quickly on this as a hurried Jay Cutler, so don’t hold your breath. The rules on flowers (bud) may change too, according to Berke. But for now, you can’t buy anything smokeable at a Florida dispensary in any kind of quantity.

Top up your day, visit our shop to browse through our catalog www.caligreenstore.com/shop 

 know more about Medical marijuana

The major qualities of Indica medicinal strains include:
  • increased mental relaxation.
  • muscle relaxation.
  • decreases nausea.
  • decreases acute pain.
  • increases appetite.
  • increases dopamine (a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers

SATIVA

The effects of sativa are well known for its cerebral high, while indica is well known for its sedative effects which some prefer for night time use. Both types are used asmedical cannabis. Indica plants are normally shorter and stockier than sativas.

What are hybrid types of cannabis?

“Hybrid” cannabis strains are strains like Blue Dream, Jilly Bean, Dutch Treat, and Banana Kush. They are mix (a hybrid) of the other two main classes of cannabis — “indica” and “sativa”. Hybrids often provide a more balanced combination of indica and sativa’s effects. The names “hybrid”, “indica”, and “sativa” are part of the folk taxonomy of cannabis, and they predate modern chemical quantification of the plant. The terms are often not the whole picture, but continue to be useful both to breeders, growers and consumers of marijuana.

Buy medical marijuana Berlin

Buy medical marijuana Berlin

Buy medical marijuana Berlin

Buy medical marijuana Berlin: Martini Meinreiß is a former construction worker, who in his words, “got infected with the cannabis legalization virus” several years ago. His blond-white dreads speak of an earlier chapter in his life spent as a bit of an international adventurer, writes Margueritte Arnold. These days, when not working on cannabis-related diplomatic missions of all kinds, he can be found in his garden and with the grandkids (from several extended families).
He is also known as the “Cannabis Mayor” of Augsburg – the third largest city in the German state of Bavaria. So far, Mayor Meinreiß has spent his life savings and countless hours promoting cannabis legalization locally as well as around Germany and internationally.
When not pursuing local as well as national politicians with a zeal and instinct rivalling the keenest bloodhound, Mayor Meinreiß is moving things forward from his tiny office – a sloped and beamed room in his charming apartment at the top of a 400 year old house in the oldest part of Augsburg. He might be described as a bit of a “cannabis Hobbit,” except for the fact that he is well over 6 feet tall.

Martini Meinreiß

Augsburg Is The Center Of Another Reformation

Those familiar with German history know that Augsburg is no stranger to revolutions. The split between the Catholic Church and Martin Luther began in this Bavarian city, which kicked off not only a watershed moment for religion but also a new age of scientific discovery in its wake.
These days, however, the city suffers from the malaise of many smaller towns in many western democracies. Augsburg has a drug problem. A bad one. Heroin, fentanyl and of course, the ever-present Spice are claiming lives at an alarming rate.
That crisis has motivated local residents to go to great lengths to do something about it.

A Cannabis Diplomat On An International Mission

Augsburgians not only know Mayor Martini Meinreiß (and like him). They also respect the work of a man who has tirelessly ventured forth not only locally but far from Augsburg’s town limits to understand how to deal with this scourge threatening the soul of their town. More than 500 residents showed up at this year’s Global Marijuana March Day to put their name on petitions to widen medical access here. Even the police are on the same side as the activists. Nobody likes Spice.

Update: Pennsylvania Medical Cannabis Industry Begins to Heat Up

According to the York Daily Record, the state of Pennsylvania will receive roughly $7.9 million in revenue from marijuana permit applicants this year alone.
Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Program was signed into law by Governor Tom Wolf on April 17, 2016. Since that time, the department has completed the Safe Harbor temporary guidelines and Safe Harbor Letter application process, as well as approved 231 applications; completed temporary regulations for growers/processors, dispensaries, and laboratories (which have been published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin); released Phase One permit applications for grower/processors and dispensaries; developed the Medical Marijuana Physician Workgroup; drafted temporary regulations for practitioners to participate in the program; and selected the woman-owned company MJ Freeway to implement seed-to-sale tracking and security.
“This has been a tremendous undertaking by a team working day and night to ensure that we have a safe and effective way to get medication to patients,” Secretary of Health Dr. Karen Murphy said in an official statement. “As we continue to review permit applications and work on our temporary regulations based on feedback from the community, we move closer and closer to getting this desperately needed medicine into the hands of those who will benefit most from it.”

Permit application on track

Despite the large volume of applications received for grower/processors, the Department of Health has developed an intake process to carefully track and log each application and to ensure adequate staffing to meet the demand. The department anticipates it will issue permits at the end of June, consistent with its original 90-day review timeline, and the program is expected to be fully implemented in early 2018.
pastate
In the first phase of the program, there will be up to 12 permits issued for grower/processors across Pennsylvania’s six medical marijuana regions, and up to 27 permits issued for dispensaries. The decision for which counties will be issued permits in the first phase was determined by using the department’s medical data, as well as comments from more than 5,000 patients and nearly 900 potential grower/processors and dispensary applicants.

Everyone wants a piece of the cannabis pie

Big opportunities exist for the 39 companies that will potentially win permits to grow or sell cannabis in the State. Interested parties include pro football players, a former high ranking officer of the state, local startups, as well as established companies that already grow cannabis in other states.
eugenePro-Bowl football player Eugene Monroe wasn’t exactly well known, especially outside the NFL, until about a year ago after becoming the first active NFL player to openly advocate for the use of medical cannabis to treat chronic pain and head injuries. Since his removal from the NFL Monroe has focused his sights entirely on the medical marijuana industry.
Monroe now plans to head up Green Thumb Industries Pennsylvania, which has applied for a permit to grow cannabis in the area. According to an announcement made last November, Monroe joined the Chicago-based company as a full-time partner and would take on the role of co-CEO of the company’s Pennsylvania-based operation.

Monroe isn’t the only professional football player hoping to get in on the cannabis action. College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, Floyd Little, sits on the advisory team of Terradiol, a New York-based company that hopes to win a permit.
Along with Eugene Monroe, the advisory team of Terradiol includes Mark Singel, a former Pennsylvania lieutenant governor. Singel served under Bob Casey from 1987 to 1995 and was acting governor while Governor Casey recovered from an illness. Singel formed The Winter Group in February 2005, a government relations firms in the State. According to its website, Singel continues to provide consulting services to clients in retail, hospitality and gaming, manufacturing, technology, energy, non-profits, and health care fields.
Should Terradiol get a license, Singel would serve on its advisory board. In an email to the York Daily Record, Singel said, “This is a solid firm with the highest professional standards. They will be a strong economic asset to the region in addition to providing valuable medicines to patients throughout Pennsylvania.”
Out-of-state businesses want in too, arguing experience makes them a better applicant. In April 2016, Sanctuary Medicinals was the first marijuana dispensary to open in New Hampshire, and now hopes to expand its business into Pennsylvania. Sanctuary Medicinals is looking for a permit to open a growing and processing facility in Lebanon County. According to its CEO, Jason Sidman, “The experienced companies are the best candidates to roll out a successful program,” he said. “The best will rise to the top.”

Homegrown hopefuls

There are also at least two York-based companies that want in on the action:

(1) Viridis Medicine, whose website simply says “coming in 2017,” has received approval for its conditional use application for a proposal to build a medical cannabis manufacturing facility in Hellam Township, York County; and
(2) Five Leaf Remedies, a benefit corporation formed to apply for a permit to grow and process medical marijuana in York City, and to open three dispensaries in York County. Five Leaf Remedies hopes to turn the former tobacco-processing facility on E Prospect St into a grower/processor facility.

Transparency is a top priority

As of April 26, the department has logged in 258 applications received. In keeping with the principle of transparency held as a top priority since the beginning of the program, the names and regions of the companies with logged applications will be put on the Department of Health website and will be updated when the logging is complete. For a full list of companies logged in so far click here.

California Could Soon See A Huge Tax Increase on Medical Marijuana

More taxes may be soon be imposed on medical marijuana in California under two separate proposals that were approved by lawmakers last week, one in the Senate and one in the Assembly. Both bills will now be considered by members of the opposite chamber.

Senate Bill 987 Imposes an Additional 15% Sales Tax

Last week, lawmakers in the California Senate voted overwhelmingly to approve imposing a 15% sales tax on medical marijuana, passing the measure by a 27-10 vote on June 1. The bill, Senate Bill 987, now heads to the Assembly for consideration.
In order to pass the Senate, lawmakers used creative wording to circumvent the state constitution, which requires all tax bills to pass with a two-thirds majority vote. Prior to the floor vote in the Senate, the bill was amended to replace the word “tax” with “user fee.”
Known as the “Marijuana User Fee Act,” the bill was introduced by State Senator Mike McGuire (D-Healdsburg). If passed by the Assembly and signed into law, the 15% tax (or “user fee” as it is called in the bill) will be included in the retail sales price of all products sold at dispensaries.
The new tax will be in addition to the ordinary state sales tax and any local tax patients already pay at dispensaries to obtain their medicine. Depending upon a patient’s location, current sales taxes range from 7.5% and 10% of the total sale price, with some cities and counties also imposing an additional 15% sales tax.

Patient advocacy groups have been critical of the proposed tax, saying it will place yet another unnecessary and unfair financial burden on medical marijuana patients, who’s medicine is rarely — if ever — covered under or reimbursed by their health insurance.
“Imposing additional tax will be bad for public safety,” says Don Duncan of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), a national patient advocacy group. “Inflating the cost of legal medical cannabis will force some patients to buy less expensive cannabis from the unregulated illicit market – where there are no safety standards or oversight. That is the opposite of what regulations are supposed to accomplish.”
“Ever since the bill was introduced back in February, the purpose of the bill was clear — it meant to tax sick people who rely on medical marijuana,” said Chris Lindsey of the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) in an email. “Measures like this are particularly harmful for patients who often have limited incomes and who face serious illnesses. And no insurance company currently covers the cost of medical marijuana.”

Assembly Bill 2243 Imposes a $9.75/oz Cultivation Tax

In addition to Senate Bill 987, lawmakers in the Assembly passed separate legislation, Assembly Bill 2243. A bill designed to impose a new $9.75 per ounce tax on the cultivation of all medical marijuana. At current wholesale prices of approximately $1,500 per pound, this equates to a 10% tax on the overall value of marijuana, according to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). If imposed, this tax will likely be passed on directly to medical marijuana patients by incorporation into wholesale pricing.
The Assembly passed the bill by a vote of 60-12 on June 2.

Take Action & Oppose This Harmful Measure

California residents who wish to contact their elected representatives in the General Assembly, asking them to oppose taxing medical marijuana, can do so quickly and easily via contact forms set up by ASAMPP or NORML.

Nathaniel Morris: Cannabis Activist And Scientist, As Seen On Weed Country

Much like myself, Nathaniel Morris is a redhead with a real thirst for knowledge and developing connections with others. For the year that I’ve known him, he’s shown himself to be a gracious, caring individual who wishes to impart knowledge and absorb it as often as possible.
Nate has been growing cannabis since he was 12 years old and has earned his position as one of the world’s most known cannabis connoisseurs. He is most famous for his television roles on PBS and the Discovery Channel show, Weed Country, where he helped treat a child’s epilepsy with cannabis oil high in cannabidiol (CBD).
As a leading expert in cannabis cultivation and politics, his thoughts are always intriguing and seemingly at the forefront of the medical cannabis movement. When I asked him to describe his relationship with cannabis, you’ll see that it’s not quite what most people would expect.

Meet Nathaniel Morris, A Cannabis Scientist

According to Nathaniel, plants and animals have always been his primary focus. His love for cannabis goes down to a biological level and has shaped his career as a cannabis expert and activist.
nate“I’ve always been a science geek, ever since I was a little kid,” Nathaniel explains. “Before I started growing cannabis, I was growing other plants and I was collecting algae. I have always been interested in botany, plant medicine, animals, microbial life, and soil, all of that.”

Morris explains that he was fortunate enough to grow up during the period in our history when we rediscovered cannabis as a medicine and a plant in general. “I grew up in Canada and I remember sending away for seeds at Marc Emery seed bank,” he told me. “I remember reading about the Smiths in HIGH TIMES. I remember when they discovered the endocannabinoid system. I remember when they discovered all these links between cancer treatments and cannabis. I’ve been closely following the developments of science this whole time; it’s kind of exploding now, but I feel like I’ve gotten a front row seat to this golden age of this medicine.”

“Before I started growing cannabis, I was growing other plants and I was collecting algae. I have always been interested in botany, plant medicine, animals, microbial life, and soil, all of that.”

As a scientist, Nathaniel is personally interested in following the latest global research, and he is a powerful force in terms of sharing information about the benefits of cannabis online. He regularly shares his findings both in his YouTube series, The Cannabinoid Chronicles and on his personal website.
All that being said, Morris says that cannabis hasn’t been the sole focus in his life. He used to work with exotic animals in a private zoo and has taught biology in both Canada and the US.
“When I started really focusing on cannabis as a career, I took a lot of my public speaking and educational skills and applied that to the Cannabis science,” Nathaniel explains. “As the internet became much more popular, I started getting more and more people reaching out for advice on their grows and plant biology.”

Life As A Cannabis Activist: Rewards and Sacrifices

With the prohibition and demonization of cannabis over the years, it only makes sense that families might have reservations about their children working in the industry; the Morris family was no exception. At age 16, Nathaniel was busted for growing cannabis, and his parents were not pleased. It wasn’t until much later in life that they saw the positive effect he was having.

“There’s a lot of eye-opening stories and people’s lives that have been turned around, so at this point it’s pretty hard to pass too much judgment,” Nathaniel explains. “I definitely have their support at this time, but its tough and I don’t blame them. Back before this was recognized as a serious medicine, you have this teenager who is just really interested in growing cannabis and breaking the law, you’d kind of have to be crazy to support that.”
George Washington UniversityDescribing how the perception of his parents and law enforcement has affected his decision to go public as a cannabis activist, Morris had the following to say: “It’s something I’ve had to wrestle with this whole time. Even in recent years, I made the choice to go on national television – I did that with my eyes wide open. I thought there was a better than 50% chance that I would wind up in jail. Before that, I was on PBS and almost everybody told me I was going to go for jail for that. Then I did a consulting project with George Washington University, which was commissioned by the federal government. They used my quotes directly to send to the federal government, so I’ve stuck my neck out a lot. Once you’re on the radar, there isn’t any point to backing down at that point, so it just becomes this escalating commitment of a cause. There have been plenty of times when I’ve woken up in the middle of the night wondering what I’m doing.”
Morris goes on to explain that he realizes there are people that came before him who had to risk their freedom in a time when they would lock you up and throw away the key for growing cannabis. “What those people have done blows what I’ve done out of the water,” he says.

Who Is Nathaniel Morris?

Nathaniel hasn’t had a time in his life since he was 12 that he wasn’t actively involved in cannabis farming in some form of another.

“I am a biology geek and I was working at a private zoo and at nighttime, I had a business taking care of people’s aquariums. The aquarium business is basically bought and paid for by the stoner community. People love to get high and stare blankly at fishtanks. I started taking care of some fishtanks for a couple dispensaries which very quickly led to, ‘Hey, could you help me set up a grow?’”

“There’s never been a point where I haven’t been actively involved in someone’s garden. I moved from Canada to Southern California when I was 20 years old and that was right around the time when Prop 215 passed and California was the first medical state. It was slow to take on at first, but I remained optimistic.”
Nathan continues, “Then there was this crazy tipping point where a couple dispensaries opened and then a couple more and a couple people went and got medical cards. And before you knew it was like, ‘Did you hear you can buy weed in stores now?’ Then doctor recommendations quickly went from $300 to $200 to $100 to under $50 today. All of a sudden there were more dispensaries than Starbucks in Los Angeles.”
He goes on to say, “When I made the journey out to Humboldt, I moved into this remote mountain community that had hundreds of cannabis farms. As a researcher, people would invite me over basically to just show me what they have going to get an opinion. After getting to see one farmer after another, was when I really started to really get a deeper understanding of how the plant worked. There is just a lot of insights that I couldn’t get while I was growing out of people’s closets or out of one room.”
nathaniel

Nathaniel Morris Stars in The Discovery Channel’s Weed Country™

According to Morris, he originally agreed to do the Discovery Channel [special] to talk about cancer. However, the pediatric epilepsy storyline presented itself during filming and he believed it was more gripping.

“I feel like the recent surge of awareness is incredibly compelling and important,” he explains. “When I had the chance to help raise awareness about the pediatric application, I saw that as potentially game-changing event; I think Sanjay Gupta saw the same thing, and [his public statement in favor of cannabis] came out later that year.”

Morris notes that the recent stream of success stories from parents of special needs children have been a great help in changing the negative perceptions about cannabis. “A lot of what works against us is this notion that all the activists have ulterior motives,” he explains. “That just goes away when you’re talking about special needs children. There’s no ulterior motive there; they go from having seizures to not having seizures.”
Bringing everything full circle, Morris said he believes another “game-changer” could be on its way, this time in regards to cancer. “After all the unbelievably compelling evidence of cannabis being able to treat pediatric epilepsy, the science behind that in terms of what a doctor would recognize, is much more compelling in cancer than in pediatric epilepsy,” he explained. “You can’t do in vitro cultures of pediatric epilepsy the way you can culture human cancers and then expose them to cannabinoids. So there is way more hard data documenting cannabis as a cancer treatment than you may think.”